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Neighborhood Conservation

ARCA NEIGHBORHOOD CONSERVATION PLAN Complete with Appendices

Arlington County has  put the final ARCA Neighborhood Conservation Plan on its website in its entirety, complete  with appendices.

The updated plan is the first in 39 years, and draws extensively from the results of the 2011 neighborhood survey. It describes new and ongoing activities and improvements that support our goals. Top concerns of individual homeowners are public safety, traffic controls and ease of transportation while preserving a quiet single family residential character. Recommendations are also made in Land Use, Zoning, Development and Housing, Parks and Recreation, Public Services and Infrastructure.  The plan is the result of many hours of work by a dedicated group of neighbors under the able leadership of Natasha Pinol.

Update January 21, 2016
At the January 21, 2016 Membership Meeting, Natasha Pinol, ARCA’s representative on the Arl. Co. NCAC (Neighborhood Conservation Advisory Committee), gave the membership an update on current NC projects. Natasha reported that two (2) ARCA NC projects have been approved by the NCAC and Co. Board and that both are funded but are two years from implementation due to staff manpower backlog. The S. Lang St. project has also been approved, and the S. Kent St. project is awaiting approval.
ARCA NC Presentation 21 Jan 2016.pptx

Natasha noted that ARCA has won increased “points” in the NC funding queue process and would like to see additional projects proposed within ARCA. She was asked by the members to suggest her “top ten”, and she replied as follows with nine. The page numbers refer to ARCA’s Neighborhood Conservation Plan. ARCA would like feedback from our membership on which projects ARCA should pursue. Let us know your suggestions at arca.ncac.representative@gmail.com.

ARCAvolunteers2

Volunteers clean up Joyce Street, July 2013

We Need Beautification Volunteer Leaders – Can You Help? Chick Walter has led the Beautification Committee for several years.  We want to explore with ARCA and our neighbors transitioning the leadership to others.   If you are interested, please contact  Chick  chickandsandy@msn.com

Update on 23rd Street Project
May 20, 2015

The project, installing curbs, gutters and a sidewalk on the north side of the street from Nash St. to Army Navy Drive,  was nominated for NC funding by ARCA in October 2013.  The County polled the affected residents and the project has been approved.

PEG Grants

Each year the Arlington County Park and Recreation Commission offers Park Enhancement Grants (PEGs) of up to $15,000 for park projects that are sponsored by county citizens. Grant applications are reviewed and approved by the Park and Recreation Commission and, ultimately, the County Board. Grants can be used for small capital improvements and beautification projects for parks and recreational facilities, such as fencing, erosion control, park fixtures, pathways and signage. You can let ARCA know if you have suggestions for future grants.   Email the committee     More Information on PEG grants PEG Updates June 2012 A MicroProject application was submitted in May to install recycling receptacles and more trash receptacles in Fraser Park (28th and Army-Navy Drive) and Virginia Highlands Park.   Two Letters of Intent were submitted for a Park Enhancement Grant (PEG) to the Department of Parks and Recreation for the following proposed projects: fraser-park (a) At Fraser Park, improve picnicking and grilling amenities and repair benches, walkways and fence in Fraser Park; (b) At the Aurora Hills Community Center, install an irrigation system in the planter boxes and replant the boxes with native perennials. On January 28, 2013  Arlington County Parks and Recreation notified ARCA that the funding for the renovation of Fraser Park, pictured at right, was approved and was completed in  2013.

Intersection of I395/Ridge Road

Garden at I-395 and Ridge Road
A 2011 PEG funded the upgrade of this area, and now it now truly looks like a garden at the entrance to our neighborhood.   In addition to the Little Bluestem, the county has planted a large number of sedum and several new crape myrtles. The triangle has been planted with liriope.  If/when you have a few free minutes, stop by, pull a few weeds and enjoy this park-like setting. You’ll be glad you did!!!

Many thanks to Patrick Wegeng and his team from the Parks and Natural Resources Division of Arlington County.


StormwaterWise Landscapes

Looking for ways to make your yard more environmentally friendly? Apply for Arlington’s StormwaterWise program and the County will help you and you may even qualify for reimbursement. The program provides a financial incentive to remove pavement, install pervious driveways, rain gardens and conservation landscaping. These practices collect or slow down stormwater, allowing it to soak into the ground and keep pollutants out of Arlington’s streams. Single family homeowners, businesses and homeowners associations are eligible to apply. Arlington will select 60 applicants; participants who install one or more stormwater-reducing practices will be eligible for reimbursement of up to 50% of installation costs. Visit http://www.arlingtonva.us/stormwaterwise to learn more.

Keeping Sidewalks Clear While Maintaining Healthy Landscapes Right Plant, Right Place

Sidewalk overhangIt’s that time of year again – and many neighbors have plants that are obstructing sidewalks!!   Under Arlington County Code, Chapter 10, Section 10-15 (Duty of Each Property Owner or Occupant of Property to Cut back Obstructing Vegetation) homeowners are responsible for ensuring that plantings or other structures on their properties do not encroach on public sidewalks. In considering whether sidewalks are clear, owners should consider two people walking abreast, a parent with a twin stroller, or a tall person with an umbrella, as well as driver’s sight lines as residents leave their driveways or enter intersections. The code states the entire width of the sidewalk, to a height of 10 feet, must be kept clear. What’s REALLY important is keeping our sidewalks clear so that our neighbors can safely and easily walk our neighborhood. Let’s each of us take a few minutes and check out our property – if the spring growth has resulted in bushes or trees getting too large, let’s spend a few minutes to trim them down to size!!